events

Forthcoming Events

All events held at the National Assembly for Wales, Ty Hywel, Cardiff Bay – Formal invitations will be circulated nearer the time

Gorwel 2017 Talks – advanced notice

The Autumn/Winter programme – advance notice

All events are held at the National Assembly for Wales – Ty Hywel Building, Tuesday evenings between 18.30-20.00 hours, unless otherwise stated

2018

Spring talks

9th January 2018 – Kevin Hague – Britain’s Devolutionary Road Map! A UK wide perspective

16th January 2018 –  Martin Burgess (Aberystwyth Uni) Can Wales shape world climate policy? Trialling Personal Carbon Accounts – guiding social change to combat global warming. Cardiff Bay, Committee Room 21, 6.30 pm, 16th January 2018

30th January 2018 –  Dr Ian Stanford (Cardiff University) – Donald Trump’s First Year

15th February 2018 – Professor Thomas Otte (UEA)– The life of Sir Edwards Grey and the First World War

20th March 2018 –  Professor Nigel Biggar (Oxford University) – Morality in the UK

Advance booking can be made by emailing talks@gorwel.co

If you wish to support or sponsor these or other talks please email rdeacon@gorwel.co


 

devolution-road-map-os

“Britain’s Devolutionary Road Map! A UK wide perspective

Kevin Hague, businessman and Chair of the think tank These Islands

Talk to be held at the National Assembly for Wales, Cardiff Bay, The Old Debating Chamber, 6.30 pm – 8 pm, 9th January 2018

Modern Britain has been one of the most stable countries in the world. For the past 300 years, the union between England and Scotland – founded in turn upon the much older union between England and Wales – has held fast. Recently, though, the future of the United Kingdom has become a topic of increasingly convulsive debate. Two referendums have served as lightning rods for existential questions about the country’s identity. The 2014 referendum on Scottish independence put the very survival of the United Kingdom at stake; last year’s Brexit referendum has left the question of how its constituent nations should relate to one another very much up for grabs. These are unsettling times – but also exciting ones in determining likely futures for Britain’s devolutionary development.

Kevin Hague, Chairman of the think tank These Islands, addresses the various challenges facing the devolved political systems in the UK upto 2021 (next devolved elections). In his talk Kevin will draw up his business and professional experience in particular he will examine:

  • Defining what the concepts of unionism mean with respect to each nation state and how these may develop in the next five years!
  • The current state of political developments in Scotland and how events there may shape the future of the Union;
  • Possible future fiscal changes for financing devolution including the future of the Barnet formula
  • Anything else???

Kevin in his talk will draw on his wealth of knowledge and practical experience of Scottish and UK political developments, which remains current and up-to-date.

Kevin Hague

Kevin Hague is a Scottish businessman (CEO of PetsPlanet) and political commentator who rose to prominence during the Scottish Independence Referendum as somebody who wanted to encourage well-informed debate, in particular on matters relating to economics. Besides his “day job” as an active company director and investor, he has a regular column in Scotland’s Daily Record and is an active blogger (chokkablog) and media contributor.

To find out more about These Islands visit www.these-islands.co.uk


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The talk is supported by These Island

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Image ©Copyright Ordnance Survey


climate-change

“Can Wales shape world climate policy? Trialling Personal Carbon Accounts – guiding social change to combat global warming”

By Martin Burgess of Aberystwyth University at the National Assembly for Wales,

Cardiff Bay, Committee Room 21, 6.30 pm, 16th January 2018

Global warming, a so-called ‘wicked problem’ because of its remoteness from everyday lives and multidimensional complexity, continues unabated. Causes of individual’s carbon dioxide pollution range more widely than simply housing choice or commuting length but depend more on how the home is used and heated or how the commute is undertaken. Many of these lifestyle attributes are largely based on modern cultural expectations, or more specifically on the individual’s perceptions of those cultural expectations (for example the need, or not, to take a shower every day).

It is widely recognised that cultural change is necessary for successful energy transitions. Personal Carbon Accounts, a scheme which allocates the carbon content of fuel purchases to individuals by use of a plastic swipe card, is a behaviour change policy working via social and cultural modification to generate short and long term savings triggered through mental budgeting with minimal financial incentives. This uses the same principles as the highly successful single-use bag levy, demonstrating that policies based on behaviour change principles can both work (usage down 71% in Wales) and be popular.

The Welsh Government was requested by a cross-party motion to evaluate a Personal Carbon Account pilot scheme on 4th October 2017.

The talk explains the concept, its issues, why and how it is likely to work if piloted, and the issues with the devolved competences of the Welsh Government.

Speaker Biography

Martin Burgess is a qualified Chartered Accountant who holds a first degree in Engineering from Cambridge University and an MSc in Food & Water Security from Aberystwyth University. For the last two years he has been working full-time on Personal Carbon Accounts.


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donald-trump

“Making America Great Again? Assessing the First Year of the Trump Presidency”

Ian Stafford, Senior Lecturer in Politics, Cardiff University

Talk to be held at the National Assembly for Wales, Cardiff Bay, The Old Debating Chamber, 6.30 pm – 8 pm, 30th January 2018

The victory of Donald Trump in the 2016 US Presidential Election confounded political commentators and academics alike. His campaign’s populist message issued a promise to put America first and ‘start winning again, winning like never before’. This rhetoric was unapologetically aimed at what Trump described as the ‘forgotten men and women’ or what sociologist, Arlie Russell Hochschild, characterised as ‘strangers in their own land’. His campaign was highly divisive and appeared to deepen even further the political polarisation that has been a defining feature of the past two decades of US politics. So to what extent has the reality of Trump’s presidency matched his campaign’s rhetoric? In sharp contrast to his opponent, Hillary Clinton, and the majority of predecessors, the Trump presidency was a step into the unknown. A President with no experience of elected office at any level.

The whirlwind of events since Trump’s inauguration in January 2017 have continued to divide – from the refugee ban to the US withdrawal from the Paris Climate Accord. When history comes to judge the first year of the Trump presidency what will it say? The talk will begin to address these questions by looking at the promises that Donald Trump made during his Presidential campaign and examine the different factors which have shaped their delivery. The talk will also explore how Presidents have been evaluated and ranked, the power of the President and relations between the Presidency and Congress and the Judiciary.

The talk will cover:

  • The Trump presidency to date
  • US Politics
  • Power of the President
  • Role of Congress
  • US Domestic and Foreign Policy

Speakers Biography

Ian Stafford is a Senior Lecturer in Politics in the School of Law and Politics (LAWPL), Cardiff University. His teaching and research interests include devolution and territorial politics, British politics and public policy, theories of public policy analysis, comparative politics and US politics. Current research projects include the three year Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods (WISERD) Civil Society project ‘Building Trust? Institutions and interactions of multi-level governance in the UK, Germany and France’ (with Professor Alistair Cole).

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The talk is sponsored by Cardiff Sixth Form College

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edward-grey

‘Fly-Fisher in Politics?: Sir Edward Grey, Portrait of Britain’s Chief Diplomat on the eve of World War One.’

Talk to be held at the National Assembly for Wales, Cardiff Bay, The Old Debating Chamber, 6.30 pm – 8 pm, Thursday 15th February 2018

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the end of The Great War. As part of this commemoration Professor is of Diplomatic History at the University of East Anglia  T.G. Otte will speak about the life and times of Sir Edward Grey. This Liberal politician is now remembered largely as Britain’s Foreign Secretary when ‘the lights went out all over Europe’ in the summer of 1914. His diplomatic record remains contested as to whether he could have helped avoid the coming war or whether he had done all within his own powers to prevent it. In the last few days before Britain declared war Sir Edward was at the very heart of attempts to prevent the conflict.

From David Lloyd George’s crafty deception perpetrated in his wartime memoirs to more recent revisionist historians, writers have sought to blame Grey for the outbreak of the First World War. This talk will offer a fresh perspective on Grey’s stewardship of Britain’s foreign relations but also on him as a key figure in the Liberal party from the 1880s to the 1920s.

The talk will be of significance not only to those interested in the history of this period but also to those who study or have an interest in diplomacy

Keywords: Diplomacy, Sir Edward Grey, David Lloyd George, Europe, British foreign policy, First World War, First World War, Liberalism.

Speaker Biography

T.G. Otte is Professor of Diplomatic History at the University of East Anglia. He is a well respected historian who is frequently called upon as a public speaker and with the media. He is the author or editor of sixteen books, among them July Crisis: The World’s Descent into War, Summer 1914 (CUP, 2014) and (ed.), The Age of Anniversaries: The Cult of Commemoration 1895-1925 (Routledge, 2017). Professor has just completed the first modern full-length biography of Sir Edward Grey.


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The talk is supported by Lloyd George Society